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Categories of animal use activities

These categories refer to animal use for scientific purposes in accordance with the Australian code for the care and use of animals for scientific purposes Adobe PDF document External Link, 8th edition 2013 (the Code).

Animals are defined as any live non-human vertebrate (that is, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals encompassing domestic animals, purpose-bred animals, livestock, wildlife) and cephalopods.

Scientific purposes are defined as all activities conducted with the aim of acquiring, developing or demonstrating knowledge or techniques in all areas of science, including teaching, field trials, environmental studies, research (including the creation and breeding of a new animal line where the impact on animal wellbeing is unknown or uncertain), diagnosis, product testing and the production of biological products. This also applies to standard husbandry procedures and normal farming practices if the animals are being used for explicit teaching purposes.

Topics covered on this page:

Category 1: Very low impact

Minimal or no contact with animal/s

NO animal ethics approval required. Activities NOT reportable to Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) and Queensland Schools Animal Ethics Committee (QSAEC).

May be conducted by all students and teachers with due care for the welfare of the animal, as prescribed in the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001 Adobe PDF document External Link. Refer to Duty of care for animals External Link for further information.

Examples of Category 1 activities

Category 2: Low impact

Routine husbandry or animal care procedures, non-invasive techniques, some disturbance to animals

Animal ethics approval required if activities are conducted for scientific purposes. Report on activities to DAF and QSAEC.

Students receive suitable specialised instruction and training leading to competency before commencing the activity under appropriate supervision.

The teacher/demonstrator has skills, knowledge and training appropriate to the activity to competently perform and supervise the activity, taking into account the competency and responsibilities of each student.

The activity is justified by the curriculum and scientific outcomes are evident.

Examples of Category 2 activities

For further examples, refer to Category 2 activities as outlined in the Standard operating procedures.

Category 3: Moderate to high impact

Husbandry or animal care procedures requiring skill, limited invasive techniques, animals may be restrained, techniques may cause some stress to animals

Animal ethics approval required if activities are conducted for scientific purposes. Report on activities to DAF and QSAEC.

Students receive suitable specialised instruction and training leading to competency before commencing the activity under appropriate supervision.

The teacher/demonstrator has skills, knowledge and training appropriate to the activity to competently perform and supervise the activity, taking into account the competency and responsibilities of each student.

The activity is justified by the curriculum or nationally accredited VET Training Package requirement and scientific outcomes are evident.

Examples of Category 3 activities

For further examples, refer to Category 3 activities as outlined in the Standard operating procedures.

Category 4: High Impact

Activities are unsuitable for school students to conduct.

Animal ethics approval will NOT be granted. These activities should NOT be conducted.

Examples of Category 4 activities

Under s.4.6 of the Code, the following activities using animals are not to be demonstrated to, or carried out by, students:

Under s.4.7 of the Code, humane killing of animals is not to be demonstrated to, or carried out by students, unless it is required:
(i) to achieve an educational outcome in science as specified in the relevant curriculum or competency requirement or
(ii) as part of veterinary clinical management of an animal, under the direction of a veterinarian.

Some animal husbandry procedures cannot be taught in Queensland schools because they constitute an act of veterinary science under the Veterinary Surgeons Act 1936. These include:

If administration of restricted drugs or making a diagnosis is required, the following procedures are also deemed to be acts of veterinary science:

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This page was last reviewed on 06 Aug 2015 at 01:07PM

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